Does this send film to Oblivion?

Written by David Shapton

Universal StudiosDoes this send film to Oblivion?

You may think we're hammering it a bit with the Sony F65, what with our piece on Belle, and with our forthcoming article on what differentiates the F65 from the F55, but let's be clear about this: we are actually at the point where you can make better films with video than you ever could with celluloid - and that's worth a significant amount of coverage

And while that might not necessarily be something you want to celebrate if you used to work for Kodak - it certainly is something to wonder at.

Resolution isn't everything

There are other high resolution digital cinematography cameras out there: the Arri Alexa (seen recently in Skyfall) doesn't have the same resolution as 65mm film which does give some credence to the argument that resolution isn't everything but the "look" is. The new RED Dragon sensor is just around the corner (even if we're not sure which corner at the moment); but the F65 seems to be the one that directors and DOPs are going for when they want what is technically the most advanced device.

Camcorder

Who would have thought that the next blockbuster starring Tom Cruise would have been shot with a camcorder?

Is film really dead? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

Here's the trailer for Oblivion:

 

Tags: Technology

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