Atomos Inferno gets major new 4K firmware upgrade

Written by David Shapton

AtomosAtomos Inferno 8.3 firmware

Atomos brings Quadlink (4K 60p) support to Shogun Inferno

 Development continues apace at Atomos with the release of version 8.3 firmware for their flagship Shogun Inferno.

The upgrade is free, and brings Quad SDI link support to allow 4K 60p outputs to be recorded in Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHR.

According to the Melbourne, Australia company, the upgrade is perfect for post workflows, leading to savings on "expensive proprietary media".

Atomos told us "The support is for both squared and 2 sample interleaved outputs on quad 3G SDI"

The new firmware also supports quad 1.5G SDI FOR 4K 30P.

The update also brings dual link 4K 60p 10 bit raw for Varicam LT, recording as Prores. This should bring down production costs as you'll be able to get 4K 60p production for the price of HD recording in camera (based on the cost of the media).

Interestingly, for the Sony FS5 and FS700, 4K 120p burst output is now supported, which means that you'll be able to record about 18 seconds of real-time video (3.7 seconds of high-speed) at 4K 24p

It's good to see Atomos keeping up the pace with its firmware upgrades.

All of this is helping to make 4K production in the field routine rather than experimental!

 

Downloads are available from www.atomos.com

Tags: Production

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