Don't do this - but watch it and be amazed. The dangerous art of Wingsuit Video.

Written by David Shapton

Jhonathan Florez and Jeb corlissJhonathan Florez and Jeb Corliss wingsuit dive

Don't do this at home, folks. It's dangerous. You won't need us to tell you that when you've watched this

As a pretty resolute non-sports person, it's easy to look at action footage and be bored by it. Especially if it's not perfect, which it rarely is.

But just occasionally you see something that totally justifies the concept of a sports action camera that shoots high quality pictures. Because sometimes, you're taken somewhere that you would never normally be able to go. And one such place is anywhere with a wingsuit, and a multi-thousand feet drop.

The thing about wingsuits is that they look fantastic. It's just like flying. Freedom. Aerial bliss. Tranquility.

Well that's what it looks like, but the reality is very different. What you don't always see is that the rate of decent is terrifying. These guys are not flying at all: they're dropping like a stone at a slight angle. The biggest challenge is to avoid objects below you as you plummet near vertically to a landing point some horizontal distance away.

Incredibly, the wingsuit flyers frequently calculate exactly how close they can fly to trees, roofs and rocks to enhance the thrill. Sometimes it goes horribly wrong as the recent death of Dean Potter in Yosemite national park has tragically illustrated.

For the bystanders, we're now in an incredibly privileged position where we can virtually travel with the wingsuiters on their dives. This clip from Jhonathan Florez (filming with a GoPro) and Jeb Corliss is the best example we've seen.

This is only available in 720p and you wish it was more, but even so: set YouTube to HD, sit as close as you can to the screen, and just be amazed - and relieved that the two guys that made this survived the attempt!

 

Tags: Production

Comments

Related Articles

2 August, 2020

This is how the first DV cameras changed video production forever

The 1980s were the decade when video began to encroach on film – certainly for TV, if not for cinema. The 1990s was the decade when digital cameras...

Read Story

1 August, 2020

This is one of the biggest influencers on modern video you might not have heard of

If you’ve started using cameras in the last few years you might not be aware of just how far cameras have come. For some time one of the go-to...

Read Story

31 July, 2020

Why do we keep thinking in 35mm for focal lengths?

Replay: Do we really need to keep using 35mm as our baseline for focal lengths, or is there a much better way?

Read Story