Shooting in 4K underwater with a Canon 1DC

Written by David Shapton

Darren JewCanon 1DC underwater

 

Despite costing significantly more than its HD-only sibling, the Canon 1DC is selling well, apparently. And when you see this footage, you'll understand why

We think the Canon 1DC is the best camera you can buy if you're a still photographer that wants to work with seriously high-end video. It's also the only camera that shoots 4K internally (ie without needing an external recorder), but it will only have this status until the Blackmagic Production camera comes out.

But it's this ability to shoot 4K footage in a compact camera that can be used straight away (without a complex workflow) that allows photographers like Darren Jew to make material like the video below.

Read our review of the 1DC here, and enjoy Darren's underwater fantasia.

Credits

Here are the notes to accompany the video:

Many thanks to Aquatech for the support of underwater housings. Shot with two CANON EOS 1DC Cameras in 4K resolution.

Lenses consisted of: 14mm 2.8 L 16-35mm 2.8 L II 24mm 1.4 L 24-70mm 2.8 L II 70-200mm 2.8 L II Aquatech Housings with Dome Port for the 14mm 2.8 and tube port for the 16-35mm. 2.8 aquatech.net

Hexcopter flown by Toby De Jong. Licensed music: Tony Anderson (composer) tonyandersonmusic.com

 

Visit Darren's website and view more of his work

 

 

 

Tags: Production

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