Sony a6300 firmware update addresses overheating

Written by Ned Soltz

Sony / RedShark NewsSony a6300 firmware update addresses overheating issues.

Sony has just released firmware update version 1.10 for its popular a6300 mirrorless camera to address temperature management issues.

Under some circumstances of long UHD takes or multiple-exposure still shots in warm environments, the Sony a6300 camera would shut down with an overheating error message. As an early tester of the a6300, and for the past two months as an a6300 owner, I can attest to three incidents, though to be fair one of those was while shooting the camera in a direct sunlight environment with temperatures in the 90s. That scenario would tax most cameras.

Long UHD takes were never of concern to me because, frankly, who would use a mirrorless camera for 25-minute takes? There are other tools more suitable to that task.

The 1.10 firmware update is being positioned by Sony as an improvement in heat management for still photography. Nonetheless, users have reported no issues in longer UHD shots following application of the update.

Sony also notes the usual "stability fixes" which we see with virtually any software or hardware update these days.

While the overheating issue was infrequent, Sony nonetheless improves user experience with the 1.10 firmware update.

The update may be found on your region's esupport.sony.com site.

Tags: Production

Comments

Related Articles

2 August, 2020

This is how the first DV cameras changed video production forever

The 1980s were the decade when video began to encroach on film – certainly for TV, if not for cinema. The 1990s was the decade when digital cameras...

Read Story

1 August, 2020

This is one of the biggest influencers on modern video you might not have heard of

If you’ve started using cameras in the last few years you might not be aware of just how far cameras have come. For some time one of the go-to...

Read Story

31 July, 2020

Why do we keep thinking in 35mm for focal lengths?

Replay: Do we really need to keep using 35mm as our baseline for focal lengths, or is there a much better way?

Read Story