Marshall CV500-MB miniature HDSDI camera

Written by Freya Black

marshall / redsharkteeny tiny camera

It's a small HD camera that's very cheap. Sound familiar? But this one has HDSDI and can be run continuously

Marshall, probably better known for their little on-camera monitors, have now released an actual camera. The CV500-MB is a miniature video cameras that shoots 1080i/59.94 and they are only $499 each! Now you might be thinking why would I use one of these and not a GoPro? Well the GoPro is limited to the shooting time of the SD card you use, whereas the little Marshall camera can shoot indefinitely as long as it is powered. It outputs video over a HD-SDI cable so you can also connect it to a video switcher such as the Blackmagic Design ATEM.

Marshall have in mind that you could use the cameras in reality TV type broadcast applications where the cameras are running continuously to capture everything and it is then edited down from there. In this kind of application you don’t really want to be disturbing the action to go and change SD cards or batteries etc! You just want to leave things to let the action unfold. With that in mind the cameras also use a new Sony Exmor® sensor capable of operating in very low lighting conditions, 0.5Lux (color) & 0.1Lux (b/w) with Sens-Up (30X) technology ensuring vivid images as low as 0.02Lux. Basically you can keep the cameras rolling even in very low light conditions.

One and a half inches cubed

Apart from reality shows, Marshall suggest the little camera could be used in green rooms, helmet cams, stunt cars, dash cams, remote transmitter packs and other small areas where other cameras would not fit or would be obtrusive. The camera is only 1½ inch cubed, so is easy to hide away once you work out what to to with the cables or transmitter.

I suspect it could be useful in "found-footage" style movies too depending on what you have in mind.

The CV500-MB is supplied as standard with a 3.7mm 3MP Prime HD lens. Marshall offers a variety of other miniature HD lens options too so you can have different focal lengths to get close up shots or cover other areas. The camera also has a composite video output on BNC which might be handy in some situations.

You can get more info about the camera and other Marshall products on their website here.

Tags: Production

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