Production

Review: The Shogun 7 from Atomos is one of the first products from the company to use its Dynamic AtomHDR zoned backlight IPS LCD technology. It's definitely a mouthful to say, but what's it like to use for real?
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The use of IP for all phases of digital media production continues to be a major topic of interest. Deciding what path is being taken into the future differs considerably depending on what type of organization is involved.
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The two Star Trek series Deep Space Nine and Voyager are still not available in HD. Both were shot on film and could be beautifully remastered in exactly the same way as the first two series produced under the Star Trek banner. It hasn’t happened and it doesn’t look like there’s any realistic chance of it happening. Why?
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Review: We take a look at K-Tek's fully featured Stingray audio backpack. Anything can happen in the next half hour...
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The seamless melding of virtual sets with real cameras is on the rise, and the results are indistiguishable from reality.
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Fancy a camera upgrade but don’t fancy giving your accountant a coronary? Here are six excellent 4K capable cameras for under $4k.
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And you thought you had enough to worry about. An Israeli security research firm has just published a post where they detail how they installed ransomware on a Canon EOS 80D.
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A breakthrough by Mexican students solves a problem that until now has perplexed the scientific world for thousands of years. And it could make spherical abberations in lenses a thing of the past.
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All lens softness is the same isn't it? Apparently not. Some of it is good, and some of it is bad. Or is it? Phil Rhodes investigates the strange world of subjective lens softness.
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It took the video world by surprise last week, and we have our hands on one of the first. Here's a first look at the Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 6K.
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Those words will either evoke a twinge, possibly a tear, of nostalgia or a baffled shrug. It might sound like a relic from Britain’s colonial days, but it was neither made of rubber nor meant to enumerate it. It was, however, once an essential part of film post production.
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