28 Jul 2017

LumaFusion - Cutting with an iOS video NLE

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As iPads get more capable so the things you can do on them without pulling out your hair do too As iPads get more capable so the things you can do on them without pulling out your hair do too Luma Touch/RedShark

Index

The editing experience

LumaFusion_FX color correction.png

Serious video editing on an iPad isn’t for everyone, but the more I worked with it, the more I enjoyed the experience. If you have an iPad-compatible keyboard, it follows some generic commands, including JKL playback and I and O for mark-in and mark-out. There are also a few FCPX keystrokes, like W for insert/overwrite (depending on which edit mode is selected). Unfortunately, J (reverse playback) only works in the clip viewer, but not in the timeline. I’d love to see a more extensive keyboard command set. Naturally, being an iOS app, everything can be accessed via touch, which is best (though not essential) if you have the Apple Pencil for the iPad Pro.

There are a few standard editing functions that I missed. For example, there’s no “rolling-edit” trim function. If you want to move a cut point - equally trimming the left and right sides - you have to do it in the overwrite edit mode and trim the incoming or outgoing side of one of the clips. But, if you trim it back, a gap is left. J-cuts and L-cuts require that you detach the audio from the clip, as there is no way to expand an a/v clip in the timeline.

It is definitely possible to finish and export a polished piece from LumaFusion. You can also export an audio-only mix. This enables you to embellish your audio track outside of LumaFusion and then re-import and marry it to the picture for the final version. Because you can layer vertical tracks, cutting a two-camera interview piece on your iPad is pretty easy. Rough-cutting a first pass or pulling edited selects on an iPad becomes completely viable with LumaFusion.

Sharing your edit

Once you’ve edited your piece, it’s easy to share (export) your final sequence as a single audio/video file, audio-only file, project (currently only compatible with LumaFusion), or trimmed media. Be aware that there’s a disconnect between the frame rate terminology for settings versus exports. For example, with project settings, you can pick 24 or 30, which are actually 23.98 or 29.97; however, on export, you must pick between 24 and 23.98 or 30 and 29.97. Nevertheless, exports up to UHD frame sizes are fine, including downscaled sizes, if needed. So, you can import and cut in UHD and export a 1080 file. A flattened H.264 movie file of your sequence - wrapped in either an .mp4 or QuickTime .mov container - may be exported at up to 50Mbps (1080p) or 100Mbps (UHD).

If your intention is to use LumaFusion for “offline” editing, then, for now, your only option is to embed “burn-in” timecode into the media that you send to the iPad. Then manually write down edit points based on the visible timecode at the cuts. The upcoming LumaConnect macOS application will make it possible to send projects to both Final Cut Pro X and Premiere Pro via XML. According to Luma Touch, they will also be adding XML export from LumaFusion as an in-app purchase, most likely before the release of LumaConnect.

Using an iPad or iPad Pro as your only computer isn’t for everyone, but LumaFusion is definitely a tool that brings iOS editing closer to the desktop experience. To get you started, the company has posted over 30 short tutorials on their YouTube channel. Sure, there are compromises, but not as many as you might think for simple projects. Even if an iPad is only a supplemental tool, then like so many other iOS apps, LumaFusion is another way to add efficiency in the modern, mobile world.




Oliver Peters

Oliver Peters is a veteran editor, colorist, and post production consultant. He is also a contributor to various industry publications writing about production and technology topics. He may be contacted through his website at oliverpeters.com

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