Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes is a Cinematographer, Technologist, Writer and above all Communicator. Never afraid to speak his mind, and always worth listening to, he's a frequent contributor to RedShark.

How do we preserve the films of today, for tomorrow?

Published in Production

In for the long haul? The idea of archiving and keeping our digital data preserved for decades to come is a problem that most of us will be familiar with. Yet with no long term digital solution forthcoming, film studios are falling back to film technology, even for digitally produced movies.

We are used to old arguments about film vs digital rearing their heads from time to time. With some major film directors still singing the virtues of film over digital acquisition due to costs, is the comparison a fair one? Phil Rhodes doesn't think so.

Five misconceptions about filming today

Published in Production

Modern filmmaking equipment is nothing short of miraculous in terms of its size, weight, power consumption and price-to-performance ratio. There are, however, some things that are regularly assumed about filmmaking in 2017 that are less true than we'd like them to be. Phil Rhodes takes us on a rundown of his top five filming misconceptions.

For anyone struggling to find the budget to fund a brand new camera, a second-hand unit represents good value if you chose the right technology. Phil Rhodes gives us a rundown of some of the camera models to look out for.

Joshua Paul's photos of Formula One marry cutting edge race technology with a camera that was made before World War I broke out.

Building the 10-bit desktop display

Published in Technology & Computing

When we recently discussed building workstations, there was much talk about the practicality of achieving a ten-bit display of desktop video.

When the power goes down and you lose everything

Published in Production

If you unplug a traditional tape deck while it's recording, the recording will be perfectly usable up to that point. If you do the same thing to a modern camera, though, you're likely to lose the whole take.

IMAX backs away from 3D

Published in Production

News that IMAX is backing away from stereo 3D, citing a lack of audience interest and set against a backdrop of weak earnings, comes as little surprise. It is a lot of buck for some fairly disappointing bang.

In a couple of recent articles, we've discussed ways to get the most computing horsepower for the money, comparing the specifications of various options and considering the expansion and upgrade options. To take that to its natural conclusion, it's not that difficult to build a workstation completely from scratch. Really.

Automatic (journalism) for the people

Published in Technology & Computing

This article was written by a human, but then again, any computer designed to pass Turing's famous test would say that, wouldn't it?

There have been plenty of changes in the field of flash storage recently, with some ranges disappearing entirely while other, new ones edge into the market. Are we transitioning to a new status quo?

Why cameras need to have more and different looks

Published in Production

There was a time when we could choose between a whole selection of film stocks from at least three different companies — negative, reversal, black-and-white, not to mention post tricks such as bleach bypass. To some extent, we can still do those things, but this raises an awkward question: why can't I press a button on my digital camera to make it shoot black-and-white? Or something else? 

Page 4 of 46

Twitter Feed