The art of Colour Rendering

Published in Post & VFX

Human beings come in a variety of exciting colours. Rendering those colours in a pleasing way has been a goal of photography since before photography actually had colours, but it's always going to be an incredibly subjective issue

CMOSIS upgrades CMV12000 sensor to 300fps at 4k (4,096 x 3,072)

Phil Rhodes explains why luminance is so important within photography

Why Rolling Shutter causes odd effects

Published in Technology & Computing

Here's an amazingly simple video presentation that shows you how the weird "rolling shutter" effects you see happen

Another chance to read this fantstic pair of articles: If you use a professional digital camera, you can't go far without understanding the relationship between sensors, lenses and depth of field. It's slightly more complicated than you might have thought!. Phil Rhodes makes it understandable

Recently I've been expressing the view that all cameras are pretty much the same, because they all use the similar technology (give or take) for their sensors. I don't mean to be unnecessarily cruel about the work of camera manufacturers – taking an electronic component such as an imaging sensor and making it into a usable tool is far from trivial. Still, the absolute performance of cameras is determined by what you can get off the lump of silicon behind the lens

Dramatic claims from RED: 21 stops from Dragon!

Published in Technology & Computing

RED and, say, Sony are diametrically different in so many ways, and perhaps no more so than in the way that the EPIC manufacturer absolutely loves to let information about new products seep from every pore

What if the RED Dragon was a still camera?

Published in Technology & Computing


The technology in video and still cameras is converging, as still sensors become capable of video at very high resolutions. But why to some cameras cost 20 times more than others?

Bryce Bayer's incredible foresight

Published in Technology & Computing

Somehow, I managed to overlook the fact that last month saw the death of Bryce E. Bayer, the man who decided that the best way to make a single-chip colour imaging sensor was to silk-screen a pattern of coloured filters on the front

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have developed a new sensor technology based on Graphene, which is 1000 times more light sensitive than existing CMOS or CCD sensors

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