Bridging the Uncanny Valley to make realistic CGI humans

Published in Post & VFX

The term 'Uncanny Valley' was originally coined by Japanese robotics professor Masahiro Mori back in 1980 and suggests that as we get close to human realism a huge dip in a ‘familiarity’ graph occurs, indicating a sudden negative response. Now the Digital Human League, a superteam of Hollywood visual effects artists and researchers, is looking to bridge the gap with the creation of convincing synthetic humans.

Game of CGI and Compositing

Published in Post & VFX

Game of Thrones has amazing production values. How is this possible, across multiple series, with an even remotely sensible production budget? This Behind The Scenes video shows how

The best video game trailer ever

Published in Post & VFX

The greatest video game trailer ever

Clock speeds may have been static for a decade, but everything else about PCs is changing. Neil Roberts describes the latest tech.

One of the more obscure oddities from the 1980s console gaming era finds a new lease of life in the animation world.

Built with Blender: Tears of Steel

Published in Production

For anyone that hasn't seen it yet, Tears of Steel is a heavily CGI-based short film that demonstrates the Open Source Blender's abilities as an end-to-end VFX and finishing pipeline

The Eagleman Stag: Dark Horse for Oscar?

Published in Production

There is no shortage of heavyweights vying for Oscar in the Animated Short Film category. But one well-decorated stop-motion flick may pull off the upset

In Part 1 of this 3 part series about applying for Jobs in the VFX Industry, RedShark's reporter HaZ, uses his experience as a VFX Supervisor and Producer to explain what he looks for in the in an application: what really works to get his attention - and what turns him off

You don't need cameras any more

Published in Technology & Computing

Have a close look at this video clip. It’s an advert for a high-end kitchen worktop manufacturer. Watch it in 720p, and look as closely as you can at the camerawork, the clever use of depth of field, the lighting, and particularly the fresh fruit.

And then reflect on the fact that no cameras - or indeed fruit - were involved in the making of this at all.

Disney's made an animated explanation about animation. Specifically, how their version of Ray Tracing (which they call Path Tracing) works

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