RedShark News

There is always a frisson of excitement generated by big chip cameras, but that doesn’t mean they are always the best answer to the job in hand.

ARRI’s Amira - First user review

Published in Production

 The ARRI Alexa has become hugely popular due to the intelligent processing and the delicious image it creates.The company’s latest camera, the Amira, thus has an exceptional pedigree and, in this review of the first Amira in Australasia by Kiwi cinematographer Donny Duncan, proves to be a pretty exceptional camera too.

NAB, which is without any question the time and place each year when the biggest announcements are made, is only three weeks away. We'll be there in force, bringing you the most important stories. Meanwhile, it's useful to see what others are predicting at the show

Why do people put video from one of the world's top cameras on YouTube with the expectation that we can judge the quality of the material? Just to make it perfectly clear: video on YouTube is highly compressed.

You wouldn’t expect the video business to take lessons in innovation from a company that makes low-cost mixing consoles. But, in the case of the Mackie DL1608, it probably should.

In our article How should we test cameras? we asked what was better: unblinking scientific testing or judging on the percieved quality of the image, and we discussed some of the issues surrounding camera evaluations. But we thought it was only right to get the perspective from the people on the front-end doing the reviews themselves. Here, Simon Wyndham presents The Reviewer’s Conundrum.

Sony releases the A7 and A7R mirrorless full-frame cameras

In our article How should we test cameras? we asked what was better: unblinking scientific testing or judging on the percieved quality of the image, and we discussed some of the issues surrounding camera evaluations. But we thought it was only right to get the perspective from the people on the front-end doing the reviews themselves. Here, Roland Denning says the ultimate test takes time.

The paralysis of choice: The modern camera has a vast array of available features, but too often we find ourselves having to jump through hoops to get basic usability via add-ons, or standing in front of a bewilderingly long and involved menu scratched our heads trying to work out what it is we actually want. Just like buying a coffee. As Simon Wyndham writes, this needs to change.

We may be reaching the point where the tools, gadgets and gizmos that we love to buy are simply good enough. This is the first of two articles (the second will be by RedShark Technical Editor Phil Rhodes) about what happens when our technology simply gets to the point when we don't actually need any improvements.

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