RedShark News

A high-end rendering technique that was previously only availble on workstations (and even then very slowly!) is coming to your phones

This is just a bit of fun, but consider for a moment the range and depth of skills that went in to this amazing piece of work

Breathtaking CGI cinematic game trailer

Published in Technology & Computing

Here's an impressive game trailer that tackles the issues of creating CGI world including human characters head on. And it very largely succeeds

Pixar's new animation system allows animators to visualise their characters with all the important detail visible. Like hair!

Holograms: Will we ever need them?

Published in Studio & Broadcast

Holographic TV: I have to declare a bias here. The Princess Leia hologram scenes in Star Wars convinced me that we will never need holographic TV. This is nothing to do with the fact that video holograms are always depicted as being fuzzy and unstable (presumably to stop them looking real, in which case you couldn't tell they were holograms). No, my issue with them is that while real life may be 3D in the sense that you can walk around it, drama isn't.

What do I mean by this?

Holograms in the cinema

Well, imagine being in a cinema watching a holographic film. If you're sitting in the centre of the auditorium, about half way up, then it's all well and good. But if you've arrived late and you're sitting at the side, then you'll have a bad time, because none of the actors will ever look at you, unless they're making transitory, sideways glances.

That's the problem in essence. Everybody gets a different view. It's not film making: it's moving sculpture.

All of which is a scarcely relevant introduction to a news item this week about a breakthrough from the International Society for Optics and Photonics, who have managed to merge the disciplines of hologram-making and computer generated images.

It takes longer with a computer

Until now, making holograms from computer images has either been impossible or has taken far too long to be of any practical use because of the rendering times. You can only make computer holograms if you calculate an extremely large number of viewpoints for every point on the holographic object's surface - a recipe for waiting a long time for something to happen.

But now, they've found a way to use more CGI-like techniques. Instead of calculating the result at ever conceivable point, they use polygons instead, massively reducing the calculation times.

The society claims to be able to produce photorealistic holograms in reasonable timescales, and if I'm wrong about the unsuitability of Holograms for film making, then this could be the breakthrough that everyone except me has been waiting for.

We're still working on RedShark's comments system. Meanwhile, if you'd like to respond to this article, drop an email to me, david.shapton@redsharknews.com. We'll publish the best comments.

Plurality - Feature film plausibility on a shoestring

Published in Business

The blockbuster science-fiction movie look is now available to anyone with a good story, creative vision and persistance.

The UFO in this video is fake. And so is everything else!

Published in Post & VFX

It's not just the UFO that's fake in this video - it's the car and the sky and the camera shake. In other words, the whole video is CGI. Even the pinging of the "Driver's Door Open" warning

There’s more to Laika’s latest animated movie The Boxtrolls than meets the eye, not least in the way this ostensibly stop-motion creation seamlessly utilises modern animation techniques and even 3D printing to tell its wonderfully dark, critcally-acclaimed and subversive story.

Siggraph has produced a trailer highlighting some of the new and exciting experimental stuff that will be presented at the show

Blender: Jack of all trades, but in a good way!

Published in Post & VFX

Anyone working with digital tools today has a wide choice of applications for specialized tasks. An office suite consists of a program for writing text, one for spreadsheets, presentations, a database etc. For a VFX workflow you might use a tool for tracking, one for compositing, one for editing, various tools for simulations and specialized applications for modelling, sculpting, texturing and animation. RedShark contributor and Blender expert Gottfried Hoffmann reports

Page 2 of 7

RedShark 2015 © All rights reserved.

Top Desktop version

music Are you sure that you want to switch to desktop version?