RedShark News

Olympus Has Fallen: Stunning CGI Breakdown

Published in Post & VFX

I don't know about you but I simply can't get enough VFX and Compositing breakdowns. The reason is that special effects are now so good that you don't always know they're there. It's pretty obvious with explosions, but what's definitely not so obvious is when a whole cityscape is fabricated

It's really, really hard to create a GGI human face that's convincing. If you know this, then you also know the reason why so many blockbuster movies (Antz, Bug's life, Cars, WALL•E etc) have been about things and not humans

Hyper-realistic CGI and Motion Capture: Big Lazy Robot

Published in Production

More hyper-realistic CGI, with innovative motion capture techniques

The best video game trailer ever

Published in Post & VFX

The greatest video game trailer ever

How A UK Studio Is Redefining Facial Animation

Published in Post & VFX

UK company Speech Graphics is gunning for the top-spot in lip-sync technology: mark their words. RedShark contributor David Valjalo reports

 Here's how far you can go without using CGI!

Will we ever have completely digital actors intermingling with real ones? Will we soon have feature films where dead actors are brought back to life through the miracle of CGI and motion capture? Will computer generated images of humans ever be so good that we can't distinguish them from the real thing in any way?

Holograms: Will we ever need them?

Published in Studio & Broadcast

Holographic TV: I have to declare a bias here. The Princess Leia hologram scenes in Star Wars convinced me that we will never need holographic TV. This is nothing to do with the fact that video holograms are always depicted as being fuzzy and unstable (presumably to stop them looking real, in which case you couldn't tell they were holograms). No, my issue with them is that while real life may be 3D in the sense that you can walk around it, drama isn't.

What do I mean by this?

Holograms in the cinema

Well, imagine being in a cinema watching a holographic film. If you're sitting in the centre of the auditorium, about half way up, then it's all well and good. But if you've arrived late and you're sitting at the side, then you'll have a bad time, because none of the actors will ever look at you, unless they're making transitory, sideways glances.

That's the problem in essence. Everybody gets a different view. It's not film making: it's moving sculpture.

All of which is a scarcely relevant introduction to a news item this week about a breakthrough from the International Society for Optics and Photonics, who have managed to merge the disciplines of hologram-making and computer generated images.

It takes longer with a computer

Until now, making holograms from computer images has either been impossible or has taken far too long to be of any practical use because of the rendering times. You can only make computer holograms if you calculate an extremely large number of viewpoints for every point on the holographic object's surface - a recipe for waiting a long time for something to happen.

But now, they've found a way to use more CGI-like techniques. Instead of calculating the result at ever conceivable point, they use polygons instead, massively reducing the calculation times.

The society claims to be able to produce photorealistic holograms in reasonable timescales, and if I'm wrong about the unsuitability of Holograms for film making, then this could be the breakthrough that everyone except me has been waiting for.

We're still working on RedShark's comments system. Meanwhile, if you'd like to respond to this article, drop an email to me, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We'll publish the best comments.

The human face is surely one of the most challenging objects to animate realistically. To make it look completely real takes a very special kind of talent

Rebuilding Robocop

Published in Post & VFX

The story is familiar and even some of the catchphrases are the same. But José Padilha’s reworking of the iconic 1987 action movie is an altogether sleeker affair

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