RedShark News

Scorcese's punk rock visual effects

Published in Post & VFX

Still believe The Wolf of Wall Street is an Old-School Rags-to-Riches tale? Think Again

A really great resource for anyone wanting to learn this complex software

CGI brings back the dead

Published in Technology & Computing

Although it is always based on strict scientific principles, sometimes - and more and more often - CGI does something that seems miraculous

This is just a bit of fun, but consider for a moment the range and depth of skills that went in to this amazing piece of work

Bridging the Uncanny Valley to make realistic CGI humans

Published in Post & VFX

The term 'Uncanny Valley' was originally coined by Japanese robotics professor Masahiro Mori back in 1980 and suggests that as we get close to human realism a huge dip in a ‘familiarity’ graph occurs, indicating a sudden negative response. Now the Digital Human League, a superteam of Hollywood visual effects artists and researchers, is looking to bridge the gap with the creation of convincing synthetic humans.

Blender 2.71 is released

Published in Post & VFX

Blender 2.71, the latest version of the popular and increasingly powerful open source 3D modelling and animation suite, has been released

All-CGI King Kong Returns on Netflix!

Published in Post & VFX

The Mighty Kong is back, via an upcoming feature-length movie followed by 12 half-hour episodes, courtesy of Netflix. Web-based content delivery and all-CG animation won't be the only ways in which the classic creature is updated, however.

Holograms: Will we ever need them?

Published in Studio & Broadcast

Holographic TV: I have to declare a bias here. The Princess Leia hologram scenes in Star Wars convinced me that we will never need holographic TV. This is nothing to do with the fact that video holograms are always depicted as being fuzzy and unstable (presumably to stop them looking real, in which case you couldn't tell they were holograms). No, my issue with them is that while real life may be 3D in the sense that you can walk around it, drama isn't.

What do I mean by this?

Holograms in the cinema

Well, imagine being in a cinema watching a holographic film. If you're sitting in the centre of the auditorium, about half way up, then it's all well and good. But if you've arrived late and you're sitting at the side, then you'll have a bad time, because none of the actors will ever look at you, unless they're making transitory, sideways glances.

That's the problem in essence. Everybody gets a different view. It's not film making: it's moving sculpture.

All of which is a scarcely relevant introduction to a news item this week about a breakthrough from the International Society for Optics and Photonics, who have managed to merge the disciplines of hologram-making and computer generated images.

It takes longer with a computer

Until now, making holograms from computer images has either been impossible or has taken far too long to be of any practical use because of the rendering times. You can only make computer holograms if you calculate an extremely large number of viewpoints for every point on the holographic object's surface - a recipe for waiting a long time for something to happen.

But now, they've found a way to use more CGI-like techniques. Instead of calculating the result at ever conceivable point, they use polygons instead, massively reducing the calculation times.

The society claims to be able to produce photorealistic holograms in reasonable timescales, and if I'm wrong about the unsuitability of Holograms for film making, then this could be the breakthrough that everyone except me has been waiting for.

We're still working on RedShark's comments system. Meanwhile, if you'd like to respond to this article, drop an email to me, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We'll publish the best comments.

Olympus Has Fallen: Stunning CGI Breakdown

Published in Post & VFX

I don't know about you but I simply can't get enough VFX and Compositing breakdowns. The reason is that special effects are now so good that you don't always know they're there. It's pretty obvious with explosions, but what's definitely not so obvious is when a whole cityscape is fabricated

Siggraph has produced a trailer highlighting some of the new and exciting experimental stuff that will be presented at the show

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